Sentinel

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The subject of this article is from the NEXT update.
The information from this article is up-to-date as of 24 July, 2018.
Base sentinel icon
Setinel.jpg

The Sentinels are policing drones with mysterious origins and purposes.

Summary[edit | edit source]

You have overstepped your boundaries!

The Sentinels are Mechanical Lifeforms; self-replicating, non-organic machines that are similar to the Korvax, another Mechanical Lifeform in No Man's Sky's Universe. Their origins are unknown but they are seemingly deployed on every known planet to balance the efforts and actions of the player within the procedurally generated ecosystem. Sentinels act as the workhorse machines of The Atlas and as universal police, policing the actions of those who reside within the universe.

They are, in essence, the "gardeners" of the No Man's Sky. If the player makes an attempt to alter the environment while they are around, they will not hesitate to defend their "garden." They will attack the player if caught harming the ecosystem of a Planet. A Sentinel will also defend itself if the player shoots it, alerting other Sentinels in the area.

In planets with rare trade commodities like Albumen Pearls or Gravitino Balls, the Sentinels will attack the Player instantly after scanning them once. These Sentinels are classified as "Aggressive," "Frenzied" or "High-Security", and that planet is considered an extreme planet for the purposes of fulfilling Extreme survival milestones.

Lore[edit | edit source]

According to records scavenged from various ruins, traveler logs, and plaques - Sentinels are also known as The Aerons, and have existed longer than most of the entities. The exact time of their first appearance in the Outer Edge is yet to be discovered. They quickly spread across the entire No Man's Sky universe due to the fact that the Vy'keen Alliance were attacked by the Gek Dominion coming from the core while they desperately tried to remove the Aerons from existence.

To end the war between the Dominion and the Alliance the enslaved Korvax 'injected' the breeding pools of the Gek with their nanites. This forced the First Spawns to work for the Atlas and its loyal Aerons. During their short conflicts, the Gek quickly came to realize that these sentinels were far more vicious than they themselves. They are so powerful that even the more intellectual entities such as the Korvax started to worship them and deemed the Aerons to be the rule-keepers among the galaxy in the name of their god Atlas.

On all exotic worlds the 'Last Traveller' can find Boundary Failures that tell the story of the multiverse from Telamon's point of view, a safety program of the Atlas.

One describes that the sentinels did go out of control once before and the entire universe had to be deleted from the multiverse. This could happen again, but this time unchecked, as the Atlas is slowly losing control of its own defense program.

Some blackbox reports of crashed freighters state that they come from a universe with different skies. Some of them were attacked by sentinels which during their last moments fought among themselves for an unknown reason. It is possible that those are the rogue sentinels which annihilated all life in their respective multiverses and had to be deleted by the Atlas Protection Program 'Telamon' in return. It is likely Telamon used some sentinels to fight the corrupted ones, before giving the order to wipe the universe clean. A similar behavior can be seen in No Man's Sky, as some branches of sentinels are overly aggressive, although for now only to foreigners, especially the player who is accompanied by the Telamon AI as their guide.

Motivations[edit | edit source]

Bipedal walker

According to an article published in the January 2015 Game Informer, it is suggested that Sentinels, formerly known as The Malevolent Force, were not all that malevolent to start off with:

"This robotic enemy army isn't all that malevolent as far as motivations go. They are simply trying to maintain the balance of the universe. On some planets they patrol, keeping an eye out for anyone who kills creatures, carves out resources, or generally changes the environment. If you're just strolling around scanning things in, they leave you alone. If you draw their attention, they attack like traditional first-person shooter enemies, shooting lasers, strafing, and taking cover."[1]

In a separate interview with The Guardian published in October 2014, Sean Murray said:

"It's dangerous on planets. Each one has an ecology, and you're not always at the top of the food chain; we've shown large creatures that attack you. There's also something else we haven't shown. There is a malevolent force in the universe that does provide a lot of combat and more core gameplay at times. We wanted that; we wanted players to wander around exploring planets but never to feel entirely safe."[2]

Background information has been found within abandoned structures on 'Derelict' consoles. These belong to a race that was active before the Vy'Keen, but were annihilated during a war with the sentinels. This information describes the inability of any race to ever truly destroy enough of the Sentinels to eliminate them, and alludes to the mystery of how they are produced.

Types[edit | edit source]


The most common type of Sentinels are flying drones, which will hover above the ground, patrolling the planets and scanning for threats. However, armored drones (introduced in NEXT) and bipedal and quadrupedal combat units will also appear if the unarmored drones are unable to subdue threats to the planet by themselves. All of these are equipped with sensors and turrets meant to protect planets from harm.

In space, Sentinel starships behaving similarly to Pirate starships will attack players which attack Space Stations and Space Fleets or leave a planet on which they have maximum planet alert. At maximum space alert, a Sentinel starship carrier will replace starship spawns but will itself release starships until it is destroyed or maximum alert ends.

For Sentinel units with armor, the armor has its own health and will usually greatly reduce, if not completely nullify, damage to the unit itself. The armor of armored drones, however, has a weak spot in the center which can be targeted to bypass the armor and deal significant damage to the drone.

Behavior and wanted level[edit | edit source]

Flying drone being destroyed

Sentinels behave differently on each planet. Normally, Sentinels only react to players when witnessing them violate a universal law (such as killing an animal unprovoked, or over-mining a planet's resources). Engaging in combat with Sentinels will cause the player's planet wanted levels (PWL), indicated in the top right corner of player's screen, to rise. As this level increases, the number of Sentinels will increase, and stronger Sentinels will start to reinforce.

Behavior[edit | edit source]

Here are some examples of Sentinels behaviors:

Passive
Does not engage player regardless of any actions player done to the planet Sentinels reside on.

May become active if you continue mining near its presence or when it starts scanning.

Active
Most common and normal state of Sentinels. Will engage player once they witness the player killing an animal unprovoked, or over-mining a planet's resources.
Frenzied, High Security
Sentinels kill on sight after spot player and scan for 5 seconds
Engaging
Sentinels are more sensitive in comparison to "Active" behavior.
Mindful
Sentinels are noted to be almost similar to "Active" behavior, but move faster and slightly more accurate.
Limited
Sentinels are less engaging in comparison to "Active" behavior. Does not get provoked by any actions other than a player direct engaging in combat with them.
Lacking
Sentinels are far less engaging in comparison to "Active" behavior. Scouting speed reduced and they often ignore the player even if they are mischievous.:
Hostile, Aggressive
Sentinels will always attack on sight after immediately spotting a player. Extremely accurate aiming and moves faster.

Sentinel alerts[edit | edit source]

Doing these actions always alerts Sentinels (regardless of Sentinel presence), raising either PWL or SWL (Space Wanted Level) to at least 1:

Collecting resources[edit | edit source]

Attacking behavior[edit | edit source]

  • Attacking a Cargo Ship (Space Wanted Level [SWL] 1)
  • Attacking a space station
  • Attacking another star ship
  • Attacking a Sentinel drone

Doing these actions with a Sentinel drone witnessing the action will alert the Sentinels and set the player's PWL to 1:

Avoiding detection[edit | edit source]

If a player provokes a Sentinel on a planet, the usual way to disengage from combat is to flee and avoid detection by Drones until they give up the search. It is best to hide in a cave, as it is difficult for Drones and Quadrupedal Sentinels to enter; however, procedurally-generated buildings, even those with windows, will also conceal the player from Sentinels. You can even dig a hole using your Plasma Launcher, Geology Cannon or Terrain Manipulator. It's best to make an L-shaped hole, since Drones can spot you from overhead, and may fly into your dugout.

After 20 + (wanted level x 10) seconds of evasion (levels 1-4 only), Drones will be "deactivated" and return to their passive behaviour. However, Quadrupedal and Bipedal Sentinels act differently. After deactivation, they will wander around the terrain and simply make noises, even having the "un-scanned animal" icon under them if they are viewed through the Analysis Visor. In this state, they are passive, and will only attack when attacked or the Sentinel force is alerted once more.

Players can also disengage from combat with planet Sentinels by leaving the planet. However, as of NEXT, leaving a planet with a non-zero PWL will force the player's SWL (Space Wanted Level) to be no less than 1, causing Sentinel starships to begin pursuing the player.

Disengaging from combat with Sentinels in space is much more difficult. While Sentinel starships are present or arriving in at most 7 seconds, the player Starship's Pulse Engine is jammed and the player is unable to access the Galaxy Map; additionally, Sentinel starships will relentlessly follow players, even into the atmospheres of planets. Entering a Freighter or space station is the only way to reset the player's space wanted level back to 0; entering a planet's atmosphere prevents additional waves from spawning in for the duration, but does not reduce the player's space wanted level.

Expected appearance[edit | edit source]

As the wanted level increases, so does the sentinel presence. Here are some examples of what a player may encounter:

PLANET APPEARANCE COMMENTS
Level 1 1 Drone
Level 2 2 Armored Drones
Level 3 2 Armored Drones, 1 Quadruped
Level 4 2 Armored Drones, 1 Bipedal Walker
Level 5 2 Armored Drones, 1 Quadruped, 1 Bipedal Walker - Obtained after destroying Bipedal Walker from level 4, Once reached, PWL is locked to 5 until the player leaves the planet.
SPACE APPEARANCE COMMENTS
Level 1 1 Sentinel Starship
Level 2 2 Sentinel Starships
Level 3 4 Sentinel Starships
Level 4 6 Sentinel Starships
Level 5 1 Sentinel Starship Carrier - Carrier spawning 3-5 Sentinel Starships at once. Will immediately disappear when SWL drops below 5.

Additional information[edit | edit source]

If a Sentinel unit other than a Sentinel starship is destroyed, they grant Pugneum and drop a cylindrical combat supplies container which can be destroyed for a partial shield recharge and additional resources. They have been known to drop:

Drones:

Quadrupeds:

  • Pugneum
  • 12-25 Nanite Clusters
  • Combat Supplies: Quad Servo

Bipedal Walkers:

Starships:

The Sentinel starship's model name is "Sapporoz S94", but the player starship's targeting system assigns procedurally-generated names to the sentinel starships.

Note: Blueprint drops have been replaced by Nanite Clusters.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Vore, Bryan (January 2015). Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe. Game Informer. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
  2. Stuart, Keith (28 October 2014). No Man's Sky creator: 'We wanted to build a universe'. The Guardian. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
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